About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CNNW 5
CNN 3
WJZ (CBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
and showed my wife with big brown eyes and big ears and said, that could be me and i went to my prom, i played high school sports, i enjoyed my childhood and here's an 8-year-old kid that's never going to enjoy the things that you will a of us enjoy and it just breaks my heart and i was hoping to come to the church and say a prayer for him and his family and maybe that would help me heal a little bit. >> wow. that is -- is he representative of a lot of the people you've talked to today in dorchester? >> reporter: yeah, without a doubt. and i think it's helpful. you know, they've seen the people coming and leaving flowers and candles. the people i talked to today were amazed, by some estimates, 1,000 people came to the memorial last night in dorchester and it does help. it helps them to know that people care and that other people are feeling tlear pain. bun little boy in a stroller just turned 3 years old looked at me and said they ran out of candles and his mother said, you know, he's trying to understand what all these people are here for and talking about. and so it does help them tha
strangers. one of those good samaritans has quite a story himself, here's terrell brown. >> this photo is one of the first captured after the blasts went off t. man in the cowboy hat ran toward the chaos when others were running away. >> people asking for help. people crying and people running away, the smoke and the smell, too, was very powerful there. >> america has heard arredondo's story before when his 20-year-old son was killed in iraq in 2004 he was inconsolable. in his rage he set a van on fire and received counseling. 7 years later his other son committed suicide. arredondo was at the marathon as part of a healing process, giving out flags at the finish line in honor of veterans. when the bomb went off he ran to the side of a man on the sidewalk missing his legs. >> i ran to let him know he's okay, the ambulance is on the way, to stay still, don't move. i ended up picking him up from the ground to put him in a wheelchair. >> do you see yourself as a hero? >> no, i'm not. >> why? >> because i was doing nothing different from the others first responding. >> arredondo said he cou
information with authorities. i'm joined by pamela brown. >> good morning to you, john. this area, the heart of boston's back bay, very popular area. still closed. the residents being asked to stay hyper vigilant. also there is a heavy law enforcement presence. authorities are investigating who's behind this act of terror, how they were able to carry it out and why. >> reporter: just before 3:00 p.m., more than 4:09 into the race, a thunderous boom. celebratory cheer turned into screams of horror. seconds later, at least 50 yards away, another. runners and spectators at the finish line stunned. that shock rippled through the crowd, many running from the scene, others towards it. >> we heard just one massive explosion, a huge boom. obviously we didn't know what it was. then when the second one went off, we said, that's a bomb, and it was -- we could smell the smoke. we saw people lying on the ground. runners were crying and the police were on it. >> reporter: blood everywhere, people without limits, the wounded crying, confused. >> it was the most serious thing i've dealt with being on the fu
. i want to go to pamela brown, covering that story for us. here is what she found. >> community struck by grief. friends and family of 8-year-old martin richard gathered in a park near his home to remember him and pray for his family. his 6-year-old sister lost a leg, and his mother has a serious brain injury. on tuesday, friends and relatives dropped off flowers in the family's house in the dorchester section of boston. martin's unforgettable smile is the face of monday's senseless attack. his picture, celebrating his first communion, and another say thaw says no more hurting people, no elm blazonned in the hearts of millions. the horror his wife ran toward after the blast. >> she told me, she handed it off to the emts, said he's dead and somebody said we need to start cpr and she said i don't think it's going to help. >> now he says his wife is grappling with the reality of seeing these pictures of martin. >> you can see she got quiet and tears welling up and the emotion coming back from yesterday. >> reporter: second fatality, krystle campbell, from a suburb north of boston,
's the same shot about an hour apart. you can't see that bag. >> i am heather nauert. >> i am patti ann browne. >> we have more on where the investigation stands. remembering the three victims the boston community igniting to play tribute to 8-year-old martin richards 29-year-old cristle champ bell and a boston national whose family asked her name not be released. >> candles lit saying this is a lesson in a devastating act. >> although shocking as you can see it has really rallied a strong community>> i would like to think we are stronger and more resilient and we will learn from this. >> many honored the victims by going for a jog. >> we are learning more about the victims. >>> despite the international nature of the boston marathon people from all over the world come to run it and watch it all three of the people killed by the explosions in boston had boston connections. either from the city or attending school including an 8-year-old boy from a dorchester neighborhood. martin richard was at the finish line with his mom, sister and father when the blast occurred. his wide eyed face became th
yesterday's attack, an elderly runner, knocked to the ground with the impact of the explosion. terrell brown spoke to that man. >> reporter: at the first bomb explosion near the finish line, one runner is seen falling to the ground. legs buckled by the blast. the runner is 78-year-old bill efrin. >> shocked when it just hit my whole body. and my legs just started gittering around. i knew i was going down. >> reporter: a veteran of 45 marathons. efrin traveled from his home of washington state, to run the marathon for the third time. >> i was just approaching the last straightaway to the finish line. and i had had a good day. and i was feeling really good. >> reporter: fewer than 20 feet from the finish line when the explosion forced him down. he says his injuries were minor. >> didn't feel any severe pain. but as i rolled over, i seen a little scratch in my leg. but nothing too bad. so i laid there, just momentarily. >> reporter: efrig was immediately surrounded by first responders, then helped up by marathon officials remember as the wounded were taken away from the scene in the remaining r
sportscaster, jd brown. >> we want them to get the tools and resources from all of us in terms of what we can do to shape healthy men out there. >> a group called a call to men, is the organizer. this is one of its cofounders. >> while the overwhelming majority of violence against women is men's violence, the overwhelming majority of men are not violent being but we're silent about the other violence other men perpetrate. organize may not get 400 in the room to hear about domestic violence. but get jb here to interview new raven linebacker, chris canty, ask you'll fill the room to hear the message. >> i want to use the platform or play in the national football league on to make a difference in young peopley lives in the communities. i realize it's a unique opportunity in the community, when you have the attention of young men. you have the attention of men that look up to you as well, that you can mobilize that and use that for something really positive. >> reporter: at the sheraton downtown, mike schuh, wjz eyewitness news. >> and that conference will reach about 1200 coaches. its next stop
last night for the vigil for young martin richard, black fies u faces, white faces, brown faces, when i was a kid you didn't have that. it just didn't happen. >> that's what i was talking about last night that whatever is about to unfold is really this city is as diverse as any city. you cannot have that reputation. and we welcome people from all around the world. and nothing will change regardless of who this person is. and that's a message coming from the political leadership. and certainly i think comes from people. i don't think boston is going to feel more paranoid or less welcoming simply because -- or depending on who it is. so that's just sort of a key point to make as we sort of wait for whoever the individual is. >> i think those thoughts will be reflected tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. eastern when the president of the united states and others come to an interfaith memorial service, a special service to remember those who not only were injured but obviously those three individuals who were killed. and we're hoping no more fatalities. there are still and i spoke to a doctor earlier th
and fox news contributor, scott brown. senator, good morning to you. >> good morning, steve. good morning. >> steve: patriots day, boston marathon day. that is the biggest, happiest, most celebratory day of the year in boston. >> listen, you had the red sox playing. it is patriots day. you had the marathon, probable will he an extra million five people in the city of about 640,000. so it certainly was a target ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigila
, that's for sure. >> pamela brown, thank you. >>> boston likes to consider itself in many ways the medical capital of the world. some of the best hospitals on earth are here in this city. and more than 144 people are now being treated inside these hospitals following yesterday's terror attack in boston. cnn's poppy harlow is at one of the best. she joins us now from brigham & women's hospital. good morning, poppy. >> good morning, john and pamela. the number we have at this hour, the highest its been, 144 injured, 3 fatalities, 17 critical condition at this hour. we know that 25 of the people injured are in serious condition. and among the most troubling news, eight of those injured, at least eight, are children. also ten people have had to have at least one of their limbs amputated. when you talk about the kinds of injuries, many of them are lower body, lower extremity injuries because of the type of device, ied like devices that exploded. the ages, we're talking about victims injured from age 2 to age 71. those are the ages that we're looking at. and in terms of the descripti
with pamela brown. pam, you've been here the whole time reporting it out. what have you heard from people who made it through and tell the story now? >> well, chris, we just spoke to a witness whose name is michael murphy. he was visiting from canada watching his son in the marathon. yesterday he was right across the street from where the second explosion happened. he said he witnessed so many horrific things, but what has left an indelible mark, the image that stayed with him was a little boy he saw on the ground right after that second explosion, after hearing reports of the death of 8-year-old martin richard, he believed that little boy that he saw may have been him. >> when you're in such shock, you don't know really what you're seeing, and i thought i saw a child laying to the left. my wife didn't see that, as she later told me and i thought perhaps it was clothing or someone's limb because there was a man there missing a limb. but it was surreal, and whoever did it was just the embodiment of evil. it's unbelievable. >> and you said the bombs were on the ground rather than being -- >> th
he often played. abc's linsey davis has a look at his life cut short. >> reporter: the big brown smiling eyes of martin richard makes the sorrow of what happened monday afternoon all the more palpable. the 8-year-old was known as a little league star. >> he was the fastest kid, maybe the tallest kid on his team. just a marvel to watch on the field. but he was just -- a delightful young boy. >> reporter: friends say the family went to the boston marathon every year. but one of those twin explosions ended martin's short life sending his mother to the hospital with a serious head injury. his younger sister lost a leg. neighbors in this close knit community are now grieving along with martin's father. >> i was outside with my dog, i saw him get out of the car. he was dressed in hospital scrubs. i said, oh, my god, bill, are you okay? he didn't even answer me. >> reporter: an outpouring of support and prayers for the family on this facebook page. in a statement released bill richard said we thank our family and friends. those we know and those we have never met for their thoughts and
chicagory powder, cumin, salt, garlic salt, black pepper, thyme, rosemary and brown sugar which sweetens it a little bit. >> whisk it up. the key here is when you season a steak like this, a big steak like this requires a lot of the seasoning so we'll season it up really well. >> all right. >> you're pretty good at that. >> i like to grill. >> this is different than seasoning a brisket. we want to pack the seasoning in as opposed to a brisket we layer it on there. this allows us the nice trust with the fat. >> can there be too much rub? >> with a steak this size it's almost impossible to have too much. we add a little bit of peanut oil because we want to get it really hot. >> how much here just a little bit? >> enough to coat the pan. little more. there we go. all right. lay the bad boy on here like this. >> oh, man, look at that. >> the magic starts to happen. so we're going to sear it about three minutes per side, take it off and put it into the oven or you can put it on the top rack of your grill. that's what the top rack is for. the rusty one on the side of the grill that's what that
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)